What do hurricane category numbers mean?

There are five categories on the scale, which are distinguished by wind speed. For example, in a category 1 hurricane the maximum wind speed is 95 miles per hour. While in a category 5, the wind speed is above 156. Hurricanes of category 3 and above are known as major hurricanes.

What is worse Category 1 or Category 5 hurricane?

To be classified as a hurricane, a tropical cyclone must have one-minute-average maximum sustained winds at 10 m above the surface of at least 74 mph (Category 1). The highest classification in the scale, Category 5, consists of storms with sustained winds of at least 157 mph.

Is a category 6 hurricane possible?

Dorian’s sustained wind speeds maxed out at 185 mph Sunday, tying a handful of other hurricanes for the second-strongest storm in the Atlantic since 1950. The strongest was 1980’s Allen, with sustained winds hitting 190 mph. And, just for the record, there is no official Category 6 hurricane.

What does a Category 4 hurricane mean?

Category 4 is the second-highest hurricane classification category on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale, and storms that are of this intensity maintain maximum sustained winds of 113–136 knots (130–156 mph, 209–251 km/h). … Category 4 storms are considered extreme hurricanes.

How bad is a hurricane category 1?

A Category 1 hurricane is a dangerous storm that is likely to cause some damage to roofs, gutters and siding. Winds could topple trees and snap tree branches. Winds could also affect power lines and poles, resulting in power outages. … Storm surges can occur with any type of storm, not just hurricanes or tropical storms.

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Is a Cat 2 hurricane bad?

Category 2 hurricanes have winds of 96 mph to 110 mph. A major problem with Category 2 hurricanes is that winds are strong enough to break power poles — which can, in turn, create blackouts. Category 2 hurricane winds can also cause damage to residential roofs, windows, and doors. … Power outages are common.

Can 70 mph winds break windows?

The simple answer is yes. Hurricanes can produce extremely dangerous winds. A Category 5 storm can generate wind speeds of over 200 miles per hour. While steady wind may be unlikely to shatter a window, sudden, sharp gusts can add immense pressure to windows and doors and can break them.

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